EVENTS
Published on 06/19/2018

Reflections from the Road

WORDS:

Dan Hodgdon

PHOTOS:

Matt Best

HOT ROD Power Tour is special.

It’s not just the cars, or the driving, or the seven cities visited in seven days. Each of those would certainly be worthy of the trip in their own right. But what makes Power Tour a yearly pilgrimage for so many is the people.

Over and over again, that sentiment is echoed throughout the week by folks from all walks of life, who make their living in so many different ways all over the country.

 

TAGS:
events
pinterest email facebook twitter
TAGS:
Published on 06/19/2018
events
WORDS:

Dan Hodgdon

PHOTOS:

Matt Best

Reflections from the Road

HOT ROD Power Tour is special.

It’s not just the cars, or the driving, or the seven cities visited in seven days. Each of those would certainly be worthy of the trip in their own right. But what makes Power Tour a yearly pilgrimage for so many is the people.

Over and over again, that sentiment is echoed throughout the week by folks from all walks of life, who make their living in so many different ways all over the country.

 

fullwidth

During the last day of this year’s event at zMAX Dragway near Charlotte, a few participants shared their thoughts with us.

Max Amick is a young man from Rockwall, Texas, who made the seven-day Long Haul on Power Tour for the second time. He drives a 1963 Nova wagon powered by a Chevrolet Performance LS376/525 crate engine.

“It’s cool that Power Tour makes people get out and really use their cars and test them,” he said. “You sit in traffic for two hours and are overheating and nobody cares. You’re just having a great time, doing whatever it takes, fixing stuff in the parking lots at the hotels. It’s really just a lot of fun.

“Plus, I’ve got friends in Iowa, California, Ohio; I’ve got friends all over the country now because of Power Tour and because of the cars. This is kind of the one time every year we all get to meet up and hang out.”

 

"I’ve got friends all over the country now because of Power Tour and because of the cars. This is kind of the one time every year we all get to meet up and hang out."

fullwidth

For others, Power Tour is something worth fighting for. Jesse Fisher is an example. He was diagnosed with ALS two and a half years ago, but still participated in his 12th Power Tour (which includes eight or nine Long Hauls) in his 2002 Camaro. The ALS affects mostly his upper body, and on his six-speed he sometimes likes to use two hands to shift into reverse. But he doesn’t plan on stopping anytime soon.

“For a car guy, this is just way too much fun,” said the Fon du Lac, Wisconsin, resident. “All the people, the different stories, the beautiful cars and the rat rods, that’s all great.”      

Fisher didn’t let the heat or any other challenges bother him throughout the week.

 

fullwidth
fullwidth

Indeed, part of Power Tour is about facing challenges head-on, something Fredericksburg, Virginia’s Larry Miyamoto did for 32 years in the military. So it was no big deal when he needed to find a way to cool the fuel in his pristine 1970 Chevelle SS with a Chevrolet Performance ZZ572/620 big-block crate engine under the hood.

With the advice of several other participants, he bought some tubing and fittings and ran the return line of his fuel pump through a cooler and packed it with ice. As a result, his fuel tank temperature stayed at a constant 81 degrees, despite the pavement averaging upwards of 120 throughout the week.   

 

fullwidth

Miyamoto often attends shows and automotive events, but he was a first-time Long Hauler. He was introduced to the event by a friend who is a long-time veteran of the road trip.

“He just hooked me when he said that every parking lot was a car show,” Miyamoto said. “So here we are and we’re definitely going to be back next year.”

He called the whole event one of the best shows he’s ever been to, especially impressed by the sheer number of vehicles and people that helped him get creative to cool the fuel in his racing fuel pump.

These are just a few of the amazing folks we met in seven cities over the course of seven days from Bowling Green, Kentucky, to Concord, North Carolina.

For these three and countless others, the automotive culture is a lifestyle. Truly, they are in it for the long haul.

 

Story Photos
(Click Thumbnails for Larger View)
spinning gear